An initiative sponsored by the Association pour la santé publique du Québec

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Acknowledgment
Translation of this website has been made possible through financial support from the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer and Health Canada.

The views expressed herein represent the views of the Weight Coalition and do not necessarily represent the views of the project funders.

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Support

Various Quebec organizations have come out in favour of developing cooking competencies at school in the aim of promoting healthy eating.

Ordre professionnel des diététistes du Québec (OPDQ)

In a brief presented to the Commission sur l’avenir de l’agriculture et de l’agroalimentaire du Québec [1], the OPDQ speaks of “the emergence of a generation of culinary illiterates” [free translation] and points out that “learning to cook is an index of independence that allows mastering one’s diet” [free translation]. “Knowing how to cook is also a way […] of inculcating in children sound dietary habits that persist throughout life” [free translation].

The OPDQ added that Quebec schools must contribute to the development of this knowhow and underscored that “school being a powerful depositary of social norms like the family, it is therefore normal that it, too, contribute to the transmission of this competency” [free translation].

Agence de la santé et des services sociaux of the Lanaudière region

In a brief presented to the Commission sur l’avenir de l’agriculture et de l’agroalimentaire du Québec [2], the Health and Social Services Agency of the Lanaudière region suggested “offering elementary school children courses in healthy eating, along with cooking workshops, in compliance with the food policies implemented by the Quebec Ministry of Education, Recreation and Sports and schools” [free translation].

Furthermore, on February 16 and 17, 2006, the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada gathered upwards of 250 stakeholders for a conference on the theme “What are We Eating: Towards a Canadian Food Policy”. Participants were unanimously in favour of getting school to contribute to the development of food and cooking competencies [3].

Popular support

An Ipsos survey of the Quebec population in November 2012 found that 90% of Quebecers thought that young people should have cooking workshops at school [4].

Moreover, results from the provincial survey conducted by the Extenso group as part of the Tout le monde à table project demonstrated strong support among Quebec parents for cooking classes at school. Also, 79% of children surveyed in this Quebec study asserted that they wished to cook more.

Would you like to discuss this topic with us?

Contact Anne-Marie Morel, Nutrition Policy Project Manager:

 

[1] Ordre professionnel des diététistes du Québec (2007). Pour remettre le citoyen au coeur de l’assiette, Mémoire de l’Ordre professionnel des diététistes du Québec déposé dans le cadre de la Commission sur l’avenir de l’agriculture et de l’agroalimentaire du Québec, 21 juin 2007, pages 15-16.

[2] Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Lanaudière (2007). Un système agroalimentaire durable pour une région et des communautés en santé. Mémoire de l’Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Lanaudière déposé dans le cadre de la Commission sur l’avenir de l’agriculture et de l’agroalimentaire du Québec, mars 2007, page 3.

[3] Passeportsanté.net (2006). Conférence Qu'est-ce qu'on mange?. Consulted on January 13, 2013.

[4] Omnibus Web survey by Ipsos, for the Weight Coalition, on a representative sample of 1001 francophone participants in Quebec, aged 18 to 74 (November 12-20, 2012).

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